effects of diminished groundwater supplies on selected New Hampshire industries
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effects of diminished groundwater supplies on selected New Hampshire industries an economic and legal evaluation by Robert H. Forste

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Published by Water Resources Research Center, University of New Hampshire in Durham .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • New Hampshire.

Subjects:

  • Water supply -- New Hampshire,
  • Input-output tables -- New Hampshire

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Robert H. Forste.
SeriesBulletin - Water Resources Research Center, University of New Hampshire ; 5
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD1694.N4 F67
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 71 p. :
Number of Pages71
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5170677M
LC Control Number74622413

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NH Department of Environmental Services | 29 Hazen Drive | PO Box 95 | Concord, NH () | TDD Access: Relay NH | Hours: M-F, 8am-4pm. New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services and the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services. Estimated Probability of Arsenic in Groundwater from Bedrock Aquifers in New Hampshire, Scientific Investigations Report – U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological SurveyCited by: 7. Groundwater contamination in wells. In New Hampshire, about half the counties mandate the use of reformulated gasoline. This has lead to an increase in the contamination of groundwater with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Environmental Science and Technology (January ) reported on the factors related to MTBE contamination in public and private New Hampshire wells. There are four key functions of the NHDES Drinking Water and Groundwater Bureau: administering the federal Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and state statutes to ensure that safe drinking water is reliably being provided at approximately 2, public water systems throughout the state; protecting groundwater by permitting and regulating large groundwater withdrawals and discharges to groundwater.

EFFECTS OF SEA-LEVEL AND GROUNDWATER RISE IN COASTAL NEW HAMPSHIRE D. Schiff, J.F. Knott, J. Jacobs, J. Daniel August • Rules. New Hampshire's regulations for groundwater protection and monitoring at hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) are the same as the federal rules, with additional provisions concerning the design, construction, installation, and decommissioning of monitoring wells. tion of urbanizing New Hampshire streams and groundwater—Effects of road salt and hydrologic vari-ability: Journal of North American Benthological Society, v. 28, no. 4, p. – Hall, F.R, , Chloride in natural. waters of New Hampshire, station bulletin , New Hampshire agricul-tural experiment station: Durham, New Hampshire Author: Laura Medalie.   Modeling the Effects of Sea-Level Rise on Groundwater Levels with Implications for Road Infrastructure in Coastal New Hampshire Jayne F. Knott, Jo Sias Daniel, Ph.D., Jennifer M. Jacobs, Ph.D., and Paul Kirshen, Ph.D. UNH Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering “Better Safe Than Sorry” – Workshop J

The purpose of this project was to document any effects of reclamation utilizing residuals regulated by Env-Ws on groundwater quality. Specifically, the project assesses the impact of residual application on nitrogen concentrations (nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved organic N) in groundwater at a reclamation site in New Hampshire. The site. Groundwater contamination in New Hampshire, about half the counties mandate the use of reformulated gasoline. This has lead to an increase in the contamination of groundwater with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).Environmental Science and Technology (January ) reported on the factors related to MTBE contamination in public and private New Hampshire wells.   New Hampshire's top court on Friday upheld a $ million judgment against Exxon Mobil Corp over groundwater contamination linked to gasoline additive MTBE. The gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is widespread in New Hampshire's ground water, particularly in four counties -- Rockingham, Strafford, Hillsborough and Merrimack. Ground water from these counties was more likely to contain MTBE than were samples from the rest of the state. Across the state, however, the MTBE concentrations were significantly below the state drinking water.